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union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
from russia. my wife abby and i adopted our son charlie from russia a number of years ago now. after visits to russia and as we were leaving the courthouse the day that our -- the court procedures were accomplished, we were in the car with people who had helped us with that adoption who represented an organization here in the united states, in this case the gladney organization in texas, and they got a call that four of their fellow organizations had just been decertified in russia, and they were decertified for some technical reason as their papers regarding all of the adoptions they had done were reviewed, and at least one error was found in one paper somewhere. mr. president, over the course of the next 12 months as every single agency came up -- and this is about six years ago -- as every single agency came up for review, every one of them had a problem that wound up with them being disqualified. at the end of that year, there wasn't a single american organization that could be helpful to an american family with a russian adoption because that was the policy the government decide
. we haven't seen anything from president obama on the deteriorating relations with russia. vladimir putin banned adoption into law. is the president's trip to moscow early next year still on? first, we have to get back to the fiscal cliff impasse and the president's decision to ask the senate leaders to make a deal. here now to ace cnbc contributor, biden's chief economist and jimmy path kukis of the american enterprise institute. will we have a deal by monday. >> >> think we are. if you had asked me before the president spoke i would have said no. >> why? >> because i can see a path. if mcconnell and reid can hammer out a deal that's acceptable to both of them i believe that john boehner will let that deal come up for a vote in the house, and i believe that vote will pass in the house though probably with majority democrat. if that happens, we may well have a deal. >> you said a big f, though. if mcconnel and reid can hammer something out. the senate hasn't passed a budget in years, jared. tell me, how is harry reid going to come up with something by monday? >> well, as you've been
to end the fighting in syria appear to be regaining momentum very russia, one of the few major powers to maintain links with the syrian regime has sent invitation for talks to the head of the opposition syrian national coalition. the russian foreign minister sergei lavrov says he believes the transitional governments with assad still in power for a time must be put in place. he said both sides must agree to a peace plan to avoid for the chaos. >> we are against any interference from outside parties, outside countries in syria. we have an understanding that we need a ceasefire in order to save the lives of citizens and we agree the geneva convention contains the elements to move forward for a political settlement. >> the lives of millions of children have been affected by the war in syria. thousands of families have escaped across the border to lebanon. the united nations estimates more than 126,000 registered syria refugees there. but getting away from the fighting can be a terrifying experience. >> at a time millions of children are playing with new toys but these children do not. bu
this compliance. russia appears to want to limit both the influence of the united states and turkey in the south caucasus, but it is unclear to me whether they also seek to minimize iranian's influence. i have followed with great interest turkey's attempts. and my sense is that such a step holds the greatest potential to improve both stability and prosperity in the region. lifting our means isolation would not only allow for greater independence from iranian and russian influence, it would also be mutually beneficial for turkey and her meaning and a number of ways. i'm interested in hearing the panels perspectives on whether this is an issue that turkish and a meaning governments might be able to reengage in. but we can all agree on is this, as i conclude, is that it is in no one's interest to see a nuclear-armed iran. and i look forward to exploring how the south caucasus region and help the united states and europe prevent this outcome. we cannot have that as an outcome. i anxiously await hearing the testimony of our witnesses, again, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure and i think that this he
as pntr, with russia and moldova and to update russian human rights legislation. we have to take many difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them. in fact, this is a rare opportunity to pass a good bill that we all can agree on. pntr is good for united states jobs. russia is a fast-growing market. when russia joined the w.t.o. in august, it opened its markets to the other 155 members of the w.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for the
and nancy cordes. elaine quijano on the family heartbreak after russia's president bans all adoptions to americans. >> we ask president putin, please, can he set an alternate means but don't let me children suffer. >> glor: he met saddam hussein and made it look easy. david martin on the death of general norman schwarzkopf and what the world did not know about him. and "on the road" with steve hartman as a man tries to save his wife of 56 years. an unusual request that gets a surprising response. >> got two of them and i only need one. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> glor: good evening, scott is off tonight. i'm jeff glor. it is the end of a holiday week, but it would appear congress is just getting started. tonight, the president said he is mottestly optimistic about a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, which would mean avoiding automatic tax increases and spending cuts come, you know, 1. the president spoke to the nation this evening after an hour-long meeting with congressional leaders at the white house. democrat and republican leaders
stakeholders' liked iran and russia. >>thank you for your answers. i'm looking for something a little bit more specific. what is the relation between the new coalition and the military council? do you think they can become an administrative body for the revolution or a government in exile as you just described? >> is there a follow-up question? >> the new coalition actually put three things they have to do. the first to form a new government and to form a military council, and in the third thing the to play a role in the humanitarian assistance or humanitarian aid. the debate right now within the new coalition, are we able to form a government until we get it in guarantees from the international community, suc. restated three examples before of government in exile. if there is no recognition of the international community, there is nothing the government in exile can do. the second thing is the financial assistance. i said before, after the formation of the serbian national council, six months we don't have what we need to do. you cannot work as a workin exile with individual budgets. the rela
to be retaliation for a new u.s. law that targets human rights abuses in russia. in the past two decades, more , mo 60,000 russian children have been given new homes inside the u.s. it elaine quijano met one family whose adoption is now on hold. >> look at this. look. >> reporter: two years ago kim and robert summers decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. enen you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? k i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little ginger boy, and i fell in love with him. >> reporter: the summers began filling their new jersey home with baby clothes, a crib, and even a stroller. they traveled to his orphanage in russia twice to bond with him. >> say, hi, daddy. >> reporter: you've given him a name. >> yes. preston mackey summers. he's a wonderful young boy who needs love and attention. >> reporter: like 1,500 other american families, the summers torry that the law banning opericans from adopting russian thedren could prevent them from bringing
now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe the situation in syria? >> well, you know i think he went on saying that the syrian government seems to be losing ground in the fighting with the opposition and i think this is obvious. but i don't think there is anything in that statement which one can welcome or not welcome. first of all, that doesn't mean that the trouble will end any time soon. the fighting may continue for a very long time still and the battle may keep going this way or the other way for a long time because you will recall when the crisis started the predictions were that it will last for two to four months and president assad is going to be toppled but that did not happen. another important thing to remember is that even if the current stage of the crisis were to end in the so-called victory of the oppositi
" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major fundi
from one nation to the next. it's about to happen in russia. where moscow is going to approve a ban on american couples only from adopteding russian children. we just improved our trade relations with them, why are they doing this? have our relations with the putin regime deteriorated that much? senior fellow with the center of transatlantic relations at johns hopkins university. what is this really about? >> this is about vladimir putin playing to his base which is nationalistic and poor as he's losing moscow and it's about vladimir putin sending a signal to the united states that he does not want us interfering in russia's internal affairs and this is a convenient way to send that message. >> let's, explain why they would think that with this trade status improvement there was a little clause that said if someone violates human rights in russia you're not going to be able to get a vase to get in here. what is this law called? >> the magity insky bill. >> sergei died in prison. who helped kill him. >> the reason he was in prison, he's a lawyer. he was defending a guy who is a frequ
is watching very closely. >> secretary clinton, in fact, just wrapped up an important meeting in russia, syria's strongest ally. "time" magazine's jim frederick will join us live about the latest developments. we know president obama and speaker boehner spoke on the phone last night, talked a lot about that even though we don't know what they discussed. the first read team says a fiscal cliff deal is in sight. what do they think the big deal will be? join our conversation on twitter. find us at @tamronhall a and @newsnation. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't re
market economics and democracy a bad name in russia. people are still afraid of that today. >> the marathon press conference lasted four hours, but president putin had little to offer that was really new. >> it was a fighting performance by vladimir putin who likes to present himself as a faithful servant of the russian people, but there was a lack of fresh ideas and concrete answers. his words sounded a lot more like holding onto power than a new beginning for the good of russia. >> efforts to bail out ciphers are running into fresh obstacles. a german newspaper is reporting that the international monetary fund is not prepared to contribute to the bailout fund unless creditors wave part of the country's debt in what is known as a hair cut. >> the imf is concern that cypress will not be able to keep up with interest payments. it has been widely reported that nation is seeking 17 billion euros and could default if it does not receive help in the coming days. >> in germany, a surprise announcement at deutsche telekom as the chief executive says he will step down at the end of
rights violators in russia. it was sparked by the death of a russian lawyer who died died in jail investigating a fraud case at the request of americans in russia. it singles out dozens of russians that police believe are connected to that case. they can't travel to the united states and their assets are frozen. russia has been defiant in this case. it is even launching a posthumous price for the new law and russian voices speaking of saying it's not fair to penalize children. having adopted 60,000 over last two decades, and as you mentioned, there are several dozen cases right now that are pending. several dozen russian children who are in the final stages of this adoption process. those who should be coming to the united states very soon. it is not clear what's going to happen to them. it's very sad because the parents and children have had numerous visits to russia by the parents. the russians have put them through the loops to see the u.s. governm says it will fight to see that these cases come together. but the law is not clear at this point what is going to happen. heather:
of other countries towards syria. syria's closest ally other than iran is russia. today russia moved five warships to the mediterranean to prepare to evacuate russian citizens out of that country. there are a lot of russians who live in syria. and a massive evacuation is something russia had resisted doing all of this time because, we think, they thought it would make their ally look bad. well, now things have progressed in this war to the point where they appear to be no longer concerned than. they are preparing to get their people out. for those of us who are friends of richard and ghazi and john, and of course for their families, today and last night when we learned are just pure joy and relief that they are okay. but for all of us who beyond friendship just admire these guys, right, just admire their work, admire that they're willing to take such risks to report from war zones, the next thing today after the relief and the joy that they have been released unharmed, the next thing today is to remember that the thing they take that risk for is to get the story out to the world of what i
that we have right now to help get him out and to get him away from this is russia. russia stood up and told him to stop the chemical weapon issue, and he backed off. now that he's at it again, i think russia needs to stand up and hopefully they will. it's also good to hear that some of the arab countries are trying to find a way to get him out. you know, we don't know whether or not he's lost his mind, that he's scared, that we just don't know what's going to happen, but this could be a leverage for him to find a way to get out and to find a way to take his family somewhere in the world. >> greta: there's always the problem even if he goes, if he gets aasylu siel some place, whs going to take over and secure the chemical weapons. that's always been israel's fear. if assad fallless, who takes over? >> that's what we do, find the chem and biological weapons. syria was a more sophisticated country than libya, but we know what happened in libya. i've had conversations with numerous americans from syria, a lot of people, doctors and people who have connections in their families that are
children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set everything up and can't go pick up the kids. horrible. anyway, a maryland pizza delivery man fights off a group of attackers. his reward? a demotion. >> he sucker punched me. my glasses flew off. i dropped the
for russia to come around and pave the way to a u.n. resolution similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that that waiting will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point, anyway, from my vantage point. maybe i have been proved wrong. approving of a u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that secretary of state hillary clinton has had with the russian foreign minister, it's not like everybody is on the same page. they're not. obviously, the russians are looking at this very closely because they can see their client busard is in a very tricky situation and do they want to be on the losing side? on the same token, with the u.s. not really being involved has not really many friends on the ground in syria. what happens if bashar falls? who do you talk to and have relations with on the ground? i know they have come up with this coalition, this opposition coalition, but that, too, has yet to fully prove itself as an effective and consolidated opposition to bashar alsad. a coalition that can have his core group of defectors to break and to basically come ov
relationship with russia. i think it was a vote on my behalf and others to say we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia to show that that vote was juft, this is an opportunity to show the international community at large you can be a constructive force at a time of great need and you have the capability to do some good. i find it ironic and red lines are talked about, but the red line here is literally red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me is the most we are all fixated on the method of killing, not the killing itself. for over a year, we have been talking about getting involved and need to stop this before it gets out of hand. we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. it will be hard to go to the syrian people when they achieve their freedom and say we would like to help you and they will say, you did little at a time in our debatest need. we have a chance to correct that impression. from an american national security point of view, if we don't secure these chem
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
the british empire. we are cutting power, so does russia because they grow during the war. they arm themselves and remake themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and deconstruction and the losses of the soviets, whether it's 22 or 20 million, doesn't matter. the idea of the whole nation plunged into this thing. it was a crucible for them. a great war. but the british -- churchill has a different motive. once the british islands are saved by the -- in the battle of britain, is goal seems to be to regain the empire. he said i did not become prime minister to dismember the british empire, and the whole consent of going into north africa, sending troops to the belly of the nazi empire, regaining greece, which is a tremendous story -- everyone talks about eastern europe. what bet the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started dive-bombing the streets of athen and killing'm residents who fought against the nazis and that's never pointed out. look at what stalin did in poland. he broke this and that. i don't believe he broke yalta. look what the british did. no one ever po
for russia's weapons that were made for were times that anybody can get. >> i think all that is true. i do think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in the 1990's, and that it works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's
pictures from russia. this is the volcano erupting on a peninsula. it suddenly burst to life, pouring who lava and sending clouds of ash into the air. experts say the eruptions were caused when a 5 kilometer crack appeared, and it is unclear when the a robson might end. that brings the program to -- end.the eruption might that brings the program to a close. from all of us here, thank you for watching, and please tune in. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in, helping to provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise in a wide range of solutions. what can we do for you? hi, neighbor! we're going to pick vegetables from our school garden. and then miss elaina's coming over for dinner. i'm excited to be with you, and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon found
republic of macedonia is still far away. >>> russia says that its forces have killed seven suspected militants in the troubled caucasus region. security forces say that a fire fight broke out and is surrounded a building in the capital. they say that rebel fighters fired on them as others were being led to safety. >>> thousands of people protesting against bashir led government in iraq. large demonstrations have been held in the center of iraq. and replaced it to the streets over a week ago when the bodyguards of the city finance minister were arrested, accusing the prime minister nouri al- maliki of trying to break the alliance. iraq has suffered its highest rainfall in decades with many areas flooded. poor infrastructure is making the situation worse, and many are blaming the government for not helping them. >> after three days of heavy rain, the streets of the capital turned into rivers. many roads were blocked, homes flooded. the rising water adding to the misery of a population that has suffered decades of wars and sanctions. in one of baghdad's poorest areas, the people blamed
in the hundreds aside from the u.s. and russia. and they would have to be included which is a complication. >> i want to take you to the question of strategy and strategy formulation. there are those who say that the united states has lost its ability to think and to act strategically if you look at for example our involvement in iraq, there are those who say that was strategically unwise and became something that was negative to the united states' broad interests. if you look at where we are now closing in on a fiscal cliff or fiscal crises of our own making that could then become obviously problematic for america's borrowing capabilities and economic health more broadly. have we combated strategic thinking. if so why and what do we have to do to become better at strategic thinking. >> attention to the inbox is killing us because it takes away our opportunity to think in long-term -- and to do long- term thinking. and to think strategically. there's no part of the government that really does strategic thinking well now. i mean the state department has a policy planning organization. they don't
looking quite different. >> he looks just like a shell of a person. >>> to russia! >> yay. >> where you never know what's going to jump in front of your path. the first video i've got for you, a very busy roadway. there's a busy road to your right, traffic back and forth. the car looks like he's trying to get around the traffic, but look out. this whole thing is confusing. i have no idea which way to go, who's going which way, it's all a mess. >> look again and that big, white delivery truck seems to be going a little too fast towards the car we're riding in. he loses control a little bit, swerves, clips one car and crashed into two trucks parked. but go over to an even crazier what was that. dash cam at night. maybe a little snow off to the side but the roads appear to be clear. but brake lights up ahead. careful, what is that? what is that? bam! is that a horse? that's a horse completely out of control, scared, running down the road. watch it again and it looks like the horse had some sort of carriage-towing equipment still attached to it. you know those rods that attach to the carria
. secretary of state hillary clinton said today that the united states and russia to get syrian president al-assad to talk about the political transition and syria. she spoke yesterday with russia's for a minister and the u.n. peace envoy to the next conversation with u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford on president assad using chemical weapons. investor four was part of an event held by the foundation for defense of democracy is yesterday. this is about half an hour. >> the good morning. very nice to be here. let me thank andy for that very kind introduction and i would also like to thank john for inviting me here to talk to the foundation for the defense of democracy st. john and i go way back to when we were in iraq together. another tough situation where we were trying to help promote space change in the middle east. i am only going to talk for about ten minutes and then i would welcome some questions and a little more of a discussion. so just listening to me drone on. i want to take just one minute and give you my sense of the situation on the ground and syria, which is changing. and
be expected on saturday. >> thank you very much. >>> american families adopt hundreds of children from russia each year. today a new sign the russian government could soon ban all of those adoptions entirely. russia's president vladimir putin weighing in on the matter today. what his decision could mean for the children waiting to join families right here in the united states. >>> and the latest on the condition of former president george h.w. bush after his spokesperson confirmed "a series of setbacks" have put the president in the intensive care unit. we are live outside the hospital. stay close. >>> family and friends now visiting the former president george h.w. bush who is hospitalized in houston, texas. doctors moved president bush to the intensive care unit after a series of setbacks including a fever and cough that were not going away. the president is the oldest live willing former leader of our nation at age 88. but today in his e-mail to his staff he suggested the president is not on his death bed. he said "president bush would ask me to tell you to please put the harps back in the
arab ya and the united states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shif
. >> thank you. the senate just approved a trading relationship with russia, a vote on my behave and others saying we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia so show that vote was justifieded, and an opportunity for russia to show the international community at large that you can be a constructive force in great time of need and a great kate as a nation to do good. i find it ironic, and the red line here literally is red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me the most is we are all on the on the mitt of killing, not the killing i.t. itself. we have to get involved age stop this before it's out of hand. what are we talking about? we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. america not being involved in this constructive way will be hard to go to the libyan -- excuse me, the syria people when they achieve freedom say we want to help you, and they will say, how are y'all? you did little in the time of need. we have a chance in the late hours of the fight to correct that i'll prese
of the largest stockpiles in the world, they could be third after the u.s. and russia. there's not a lot of information on the exact location. options in terms of preemptively taking care of the chemical weapons are difficult. one option would be to send ground troops in. it is a hostile environment. the pentagon estimates there could be as many as 75,000 troops that would be needed to do that. another option would be to preemptively bomb but then you have dispersal of the agents and so forth. a third would try to seek some sort of property to go in and secure the site. it is a very difficult set of issues as president obama has clearly noted in the clip and has drawn a clear line on the use by the assaad regime. host: here is where syria is located in the middle east. adjacent to 11 on, i rock, and turkey. this civil war has not been going on 21 months. how has he been able to retain power? -- they are adjacent to lebanon, iraq, and turkey. guest: there have been times in the past when a bomb attack killed four members of his inner circle and people thought it could be the beginning of
, french, german, russia, china, so once all tend to view it as a proliferation problem. it tends to be about that issue very narrowly focused. so to kind of move the conversation, you have to figure a different architecture to address that. but the five plus one processors such as designed to do with the proliferation issue in the conversation is that it has to do with arantxa violations of the npt that a security council resolution suggests iran activity so forth and so on. there's two countries however that suggests the issue that this is not a proliferation issue that has to do with the character for the regime but those are for israel. the second one is iran who similarly suggested that this is nice control issue from the perspective of the west, but there really is an arms control is a multilateral icing regime. there were two that is in this particular who are not accepting the argument. the argument about nuclear infractions. so having said that, if you look at it historically, the united states has managed to negotiate successfully arms control treaties with countries of
an approximation. >> this week the secretary of state hillary clinton, she met with russia's foreign minister and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported
. some u.s. senators say now is the time for russia to act. >> this is an opportunity for russia to show the international community at large that you can be a constructive force at a time of great need. and you have a unique capability as a nation to do some good. >> reporter: for the u.s., the insurgents gains are a double-edged sword. some of the most ruthlessly affected fighters also are the most radicalized. washington is moving to declare one of those groups a terrorist organization. but the obama administration worries that the stronger radical fighters become the more armed combat, not political efforts to find a solution will decide the outcome in syria. early next week secretary clinton travels to morocco for a meeting of the so-called friends of syria group. the focus will be on the opposition with the obama administration taking the first steps towards officially recognizing them. jill dougherty, cnn, dublin. >>> we're just a few minutes away from speaking with senator jim demint of south carolina. he's here live in "the situation room." he will explain his stunning decision
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